Independent nations – List Nation http://list-nation.com/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 02:51:40 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://list-nation.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png Independent nations – List Nation http://list-nation.com/ 32 32 AFL pledges to investigate ‘heartbreaking and disturbing’ allegations by Hawthorn First Nations players | AFL https://list-nation.com/afl-pledges-to-investigate-heartbreaking-and-disturbing-allegations-by-hawthorn-first-nations-players-afl/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 23:56:00 +0000 https://list-nation.com/afl-pledges-to-investigate-heartbreaking-and-disturbing-allegations-by-hawthorn-first-nations-players-afl/ The AFL will set up an external independent panel to investigate ‘difficult, heartbreaking and disturbing’ allegations of Hawthorn’s mistreatment of former First Nations players, including that the Hawks separated Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander players from their families and pressured a couple to terminate a pregnancy. . AFL chief executive Gillon McLachlan faced the media […]]]>

The AFL will set up an external independent panel to investigate ‘difficult, heartbreaking and disturbing’ allegations of Hawthorn’s mistreatment of former First Nations players, including that the Hawks separated Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander players from their families and pressured a couple to terminate a pregnancy. .

AFL chief executive Gillon McLachlan faced the media on Wednesday after the ABC reported the distressing content of a review commissioned by Hawthorn based on interviews with First Nations players, promising that the body leader “would get to the bottom of things”.

“What we have seen today is a difficult, heartbreaking and disturbing read,” he said. “I acknowledge the pain, anger and grief of the people who shared their experiences and told their stories and all those affected.

“I want to tell the women and partners and players who have shared their stories that our first priority is you, and providing the care and support you need. You have been heard, and as a supporter and community, we will do our best to hug you.

“It is important that we continue to communicate with you and to you. Your wellbeing is the most pressing priority for us because I know sharing these stories isn’t easy, but it’s important that you do, and they want to thank you all who have shared their experiences in the framework of this review.

McLachlan said the AFL will finalize the composition of the independent panel over the next 24 hours with a view to expediting the process for the well-being of people reliving the trauma they have suffered.

It will be led by “a distinguished King’s Counsel” and others who “have the right mix of diversity and an approach that prioritizes cultural safety for all who have shared their experiences.”

The reports of racism, prejudice and discrimination experienced by Indigenous players and their families at Hawthorn FC are heartbreaking.

Today my thoughts are with the players and their families who were allegedly subjected to horrific treatment.

— MP Linda Burney (@LindaBurneyMP) September 20, 2022

“We need to conduct a proper investigation to get to the bottom of this and that’s important, out of respect for those making the allegations and out of respect for those who are accused,” McLachlan said.

“We must ensure natural justice and allow the process to continue, but we will seek to set up the panel and work with Hawthorn Football Club to develop the report of the games and the partners involved to engage with them, to accelerate it and does not prolong the trauma.

McLachlan said the AFL received Hawthorn’s review “about a week ago” but confirmed there were no plans to release it in full. He said he had spoken with clubs and representatives of the defendants, and it would be up to those parties to respond.

Minister for Indigenous Australians Linda Burney on Wednesday called the allegations “heartbreaking”, while former Hawthorn captain Luke Hodge said the news was “a shock to the system”.

The Hawks released a statement on Wednesday confirming the review was in the hands of the AFL, but declined to comment further. A spokesperson said it would not be made public as the club had interviewed players on a guarantee of anonymity.

“Earlier this year, Hawthorn Football Club engaged external First Nations consultants to liaise with current and former First Nations players and staff to learn more about their experience at the club,” the statement read. .

“This important work has raised troubling historical allegations that require further investigation. Upon learning of these allegations, the club immediately engaged AFL Integrity, as appropriate.

“The club will continue to support those who have been part of this process, and their well-being remains our priority.

“While the process indicated that the club’s current environment is culturally safe, it also recommended that some of the club’s current First Nations training and development programs continue to be strengthened.

“The club places the best interests and welfare of our players and staff as our number one priority.”

The explosive report comes about 18 months after the publication of Collingwood’s Do Better report, which exposed a systemic culture of racism among the Magpies, and the Hawthorn report is expected to have an equally big impact.

“The reports of racism, prejudice and discrimination experienced by Indigenous players and their families at Hawthorn FC are heartbreaking,” Burney said on Twitter. “My thoughts today are with the players and their families who were allegedly subjected to horrific treatment.”

Hodge, who played for Hawthorn between 2002 and 2017, said reading the allegations was “very uncomfortable”.

“It’s a shock to the system to read some of the things that were alleged there,” Hodge told SEN.

“You can’t put yourself in the shoes of the players and their families and what they have been told by people they are supposed to look up to. It’s an uncomfortable position for them to have had to go through and you feel for them. .

AFL Players’ Association chief executive Paul Marsh said the organization was “extremely concerned” about the allegations, while its chairman, Geelong midfielder Patrick Dangerfield, called them of “disturbing”.

“We have spoken to the AFL and communicated our expectations that an independent investigation should be carried out,” Marsh said. “It should also be well resourced and have a broad reach.”

Marsh said relevant stakeholders and partners “will continue to have AFLPA’s full support through our various programs and services.”

Dangerfield told SEN that Hawthorn’s allegations suggested ‘we haven’t done our job… as an industry’. “It should never have come to this,” he said.

“Players have a lot of faith in the people at football clubs, that they have their best interests at heart and football is definitely part of that, but it should never be just football.”

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In a turbulent world, leaders of nations meet at the UN https://list-nation.com/in-a-turbulent-world-leaders-of-nations-meet-at-the-un/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 17:57:55 +0000 https://list-nation.com/in-a-turbulent-world-leaders-of-nations-meet-at-the-un/ Faced with a complex set of challenges that are testing humanity like never before, world leaders are meeting at the United Nations this week in the shadow of Europe’s first major war since World War II – a conflict that has sparked a food crisis. world and divided the great powers in a way not […]]]>

Faced with a complex set of challenges that are testing humanity like never before, world leaders are meeting at the United Nations this week in the shadow of Europe’s first major war since World War II – a conflict that has sparked a food crisis. world and divided the great powers in a way not seen since the cold war.

The many facets of the war in Ukraine are set to dominate the annual meeting, which comes together as many countries and peoples face growing inequality, a worsening climate crisis, the threat of multiple famines and a surge internet-fueled misinformation and hate speech – all atop a coronavirus pandemic that is halfway through its third year.

For the first time since the United Nations was founded from the ashes of World War II, European nations are witnessing a war waged within them by neighboring nuclear-armed Russia. Its February 24 invasion not only threatens Ukraine’s survival as an independent democratic nation, but worries the leaders of many countries about preserving regional and international peace and preventing a wider war.

UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said strategic divisions – with the West on one side and Russia and increasingly China on the other – “cripple the global response to the dramatic challenges facing we are facing “.

He highlighted not only the devastation in Ukraine after almost seven months of fighting, but also the impact of the war on the global economy.

Escalating food and energy prices are hitting the world’s poorest people the hardest, and nations are “devoured by the acids of nationalism and self-interest” instead of working together and peacefully resolving disputes, two principles that are at the heart of the UN Charter and underpin everything the UN tries to do.

“The General Assembly is meeting at a time of great peril,” the UN chief said last week.

For the first time in three years, the leaders will deliver their speeches in person in the vast General Assembly Hall. There will be no more pre-recorded addresses or hybrid meetings caused by COVID, with one exception: Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy.

Despite objections from Russia and a few allies, the 193-member assembly voted overwhelmingly on Friday to allow the Ukrainian leader to pre-record his speech for reasons beyond his control – “the ongoing foreign invasion ” and military hostilities that require it to carry out its “duties of national defense and security”.

The death of Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II and her funeral in London on Monday, which many world leaders plan to attend, created last-minute headaches for the high-level meeting. Diplomats and UN staff are scrambling to cope with changes in travel plans, the timing of some events and the logistically complex timing of speeches by world leaders.

Guterres skips the funeral to chair Monday’s ‘Transforming Education Summit’ which he called for creating action on a UN goal to ensure quality education for all children by 2030 who lost a lot of ground during the pandemic.

The real gathering of world leaders, known as the General Debate, begins Tuesday morning with the UN chief’s state of the world address to the 77th session of the General Assembly which began on September 12. Brazil has spoken first for more than seven decades because in the first sessions of the General Assembly, it volunteered to speak first when no other country did.

The United States, chair, representing the host nation of the United Nations, is traditionally the second speaker. But President Joe Biden is attending the Queen’s funeral and his speech has been postponed until Wednesday morning. Senegalese President Macky Sall is expected to take Biden’s place.

Nearly 150 presidents, prime ministers and monarchs are on the latest list of speakers, a very high number reflecting the importance of the meeting not only for presenting each country’s worldview, but also for private and individual meetings where diplomats say a lot of business in the world is done.

Besides Zelenskyy, Biden and Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, other heads of state who have come to the UN include the presidents of Turkey, Iran, France, Colombia, South Korea, South Africa, Egypt and Venezuela. Heads of government on the list include new British Prime Minister Liz Truss, with German Chancellor Olaf Scholz also making a first appearance, and the prime ministers of Japan, Israel, Iraq and Pakistan. Russia and China send their foreign ministers.

For many years, the foreign ministers of the five permanent members of the UN Security Council with the right of veto – the United States, Russia, China, Britain and France – have met aside for lunch or dinner. Diplomats said no meeting was scheduled for this year.

During typical high-level weeks, thousands of people are in the United Nations complex for speeches and hundreds of side events. But due to the persistence of the pandemic, only the few events organized by the Secretary-General and the President of the General Assembly are being held this year at UN headquarters. Dozens of side events will take place elsewhere in the city.

Richard Gowan, director of the International Crisis Group at the UN, said that Ukraine and the food crisis would be the two “overarching themes” and that the message from Western leaders would be clear: “This is the war of aggression by Russia and it is a huge attack on the United Nations system.

A highlight will be the ministerial meeting of the UN Security Council on September 22 on the fight against impunity in the war in Ukraine – a subject decided by France, which holds the presidency of the Council this month. The meeting could bring together the foreign ministers of the five Permanent Council nations in the same room as Ukrainian Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba, who has been invited.

France’s UN ambassador Nicolas De Rivière said on Friday that “the perpetrators will be held responsible” for the “dramatic consequences” that “the war of Russian aggression” has had on civilians in Ukraine. And US Ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield said the United Nations faces “a crisis of confidence” caused by Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, which violated sovereignty and territorial integrity of its neighbour, “trampled upon human rights” and struck at the heart of the United Nations Charter by pursuing war instead of a negotiated peace.

She told reporters on Friday that the response must be to “redouble our commitment to a peaceful world and to uphold even more closely our deeply held principles of sovereignty, territorial integrity, peace and security. “.

Thomas-Greenfield insisted that the high-level meeting “will not be dominated by Ukraine” as there are also conflicts elsewhere. That’s why she says the United States is focused on addressing the food crisis as well as climate change, promoting global health, and upholding the UN Charter.

Gowan, of the Crisis Group, said his organization has seen in recent weeks that countries in Africa and Latin America “have gradually succumbed to Ukraine fatigue”, and that there is a feeling in many many parts of the UN “that countries don’t want to have to constantly attack Russia.” There is a clear understanding among Western leaders, and particularly in the United States, of the need “to keep non-Western countries on board Ukraine”, he said.

Gowan said he will also listen to “an undercurrent of discontent” from African nations and countries in the global South about how disappointed they have been with COVID-19 vaccinations and funding to fight climate change and make in the face of escalating food prices and the cost of living. He also lamented that the crises in Mali, Afghanistan and Yemen were not in the foreground.

Secretary-General Guterres, who has just visited Pakistan where he said the flooded area is three times larger than his home country of Portugal, lashed out at the group of 20 richest nations, which , according to him, are responsible for 80% of the emissions that cause global warming. .

“My message to world leaders gathered here is clear: Turn down the heat – now,” he said. “Don’t flood the world today, don’t drown it tomorrow.”

___

Edith M. Lederer is the UN’s chief correspondent for the Associated Press and has covered international affairs for more than half a century. For more AP coverage of the United Nations General Assembly, visit https://apnews.com/hub/united-nations-general-assembly.

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MKO says First Nations food hunting rights are being violated https://list-nation.com/mko-says-first-nations-food-hunting-rights-are-being-violated/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 17:35:13 +0000 https://list-nation.com/mko-says-first-nations-food-hunting-rights-are-being-violated/ According to a legal opinion, Aboriginal hunters should be given top priority to hunt moose after considering conservation requirements. An organization that represents First Nations in northern Manitoba says the provincial government is not ensuring Indigenous hunters can harvest enough moose for their own consumption before issuing licenses to non-Indigenous hunters. Manitoba Keewatinowi Okimakanak, a […]]]>

According to a legal opinion, Aboriginal hunters should be given top priority to hunt moose after considering conservation requirements.

An organization that represents First Nations in northern Manitoba says the provincial government is not ensuring Indigenous hunters can harvest enough moose for their own consumption before issuing licenses to non-Indigenous hunters.

Manitoba Keewatinowi Okimakanak, a political advocacy organization that speaks on behalf of two dozen northern First Nations, says it has written to provincial government officials about it three times in the space of nine months and still has not received response.

An initial letter to Premier Heather Stefanson and provincial ministers was sent on Dec. 7, MKO Garrison Grand Commander Settee said in a Sept. 16 press release. This was followed by another letter on May 30. On June 7, during a meeting with Indigenous Reconciliation Minister Alan Lagimodière, MKO reiterated its demand that First Nations hunters be given top priority for available moose once conservation goals are met.

“Although Minister Lagimodière directed provincial officials to have a conversation with MKO regarding MKO’s demands, no such conversation with MKO was initiated or requested by Manitoba,” Settee said.

MKO sent a third letter to the Prime Minister and Ministers on September 14, five days before the start of the authorized moose hunt in much of the MKO region on September 19.

MKO’s position is that non-native hunters should not be issued licenses to hunt moose in its First Nations areas until the native hunters have had an opportunity to catch enough moose to consumption by First Nations people.

Settee said it can be established through traditional knowledge and expert evidence that every moose not protected by conservation regulations could be eaten as food by First Nations.

Legal Aid Manitoba’s Public Interest Law Center has reviewed MKO’s legal opinion and says that 30-year-old Supreme Court of Canada decisions establish that First Nations are constitutionally given priority in hunting moose and that Manitoba issues moose licenses to non-Aboriginal hunters and The lottery system by which these licenses are issued limits the right of First Nations to hunt moose for food.

“Manitoba is vulnerable to a claim of unjustified interference with First Nations’ right to harvest moose,” said Public Interest Law Center director Byron Williams and independent attorney Natalie Copps, who provided analytical support on legal matters involving the legislative capacity of MKO First Nations. .

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Gareth Bale could miss Wales Nations League opener due to LAFC schedule https://list-nation.com/gareth-bale-could-miss-wales-nations-league-opener-due-to-lafc-schedule/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 21:37:21 +0000 https://list-nation.com/gareth-bale-could-miss-wales-nations-league-opener-due-to-lafc-schedule/ Gareth Bale is at risk of missing Wales’ Nations League game in Belgium, despite having planned a transatlantic run to join Robert Page’s side. Bale is due to play for his MLS club Los Angeles FC in the early hours of Monday morning UK time and will not arrive in Wales until Tuesday. Wales will […]]]>

Gareth Bale is at risk of missing Wales’ Nations League game in Belgium, despite having planned a transatlantic run to join Robert Page’s side.

Bale is due to play for his MLS club Los Angeles FC in the early hours of Monday morning UK time and will not arrive in Wales until Tuesday.

Wales will train at their Vale of Glamorgan base on Wednesday before flying to Brussels for their penultimate Nations League encounter the following evening.

Boss Page said: “We haven’t gone into specifics yet, but all we know is that it will be affected.

“He’s not going to land until Tuesday and we have to get him from Heathrow.

“There will be a lot of planning in terms of, ‘Is he going to be ready for the first game against Belgium?’

“Otherwise, obviously, we might have to leave him for the game against Poland.

“But his safety and health is the most important thing, so we will have to deal with that.

“We want him in perfect condition, we don’t want him to be tired before games and run the risk of injury.”

Despite being in the United States for less than three months, Bale already owns the best-selling shirt in all of MLS.

But the Wales captain got off to a slow start on the LAFC pitch after his trophy-laden nine-year spell at Real Madrid ended in the summer.

He has made 10 appearances for the United but has only started twice and is yet to play 90 minutes for his new club.

In just over five hours of football, Bale has scored twice as he builds up his fitness ahead of the World Cup in November.

Page said: “He plays minutes. We want him to play more minutes, of course, but I’m not too worried.

“No matter how many minutes he plays, I know that when he comes to camp, even if he doesn’t play, he will be ready to play for us.

“We are not going to put him in danger. We are going to the World Cup.

“We want to stay in the division (Nations League), but we won’t mess around and push it.

“You’re going to have to deal with that with jet lag and jet lag. We’ll take him to camp, assess him and make a plan.

Wales complete their Nations League program against Poland in Cardiff on September 25, three days after the game against Belgium.

It will be their last match before the World Cup, with Wales likely to beat Poland to retain their place in the Nations League top flight.

Page, who signed a four-year deal this week to be in charge of the Euro 2024 and 2026 World Cup qualifying campaigns, expects Bale, 33, to be around for a while .

He said: “We want Gareth to stay involved for as long as he can. He can have an influence on the young players of each camp.

“I don’t think there will be a mass of six or seven players leaving (after the World Cup).

“They respect the culture so much that they don’t want it to have a serious impact.”

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‘We are erased’: Afghan women demand action at the United Nations https://list-nation.com/we-are-erased-afghan-women-demand-action-at-the-united-nations/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 22:41:01 +0000 https://list-nation.com/we-are-erased-afghan-women-demand-action-at-the-united-nations/ Afghan women launched an impassioned plea at the UN on Monday for strong international action to fight “gender apartheid” in their country since the Taliban came to power last year. “Today, human rights in Afghanistan do not exist,” Afghan journalist Mahbouba Seraj told the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva. The outspoken journalist and rights […]]]>

Afghan women launched an impassioned plea at the UN on Monday for strong international action to fight “gender apartheid” in their country since the Taliban came to power last year.

“Today, human rights in Afghanistan do not exist,” Afghan journalist Mahbouba Seraj told the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva.

The outspoken journalist and rights activist said she was ‘sick and tired’ of sounding the alarm over the decimation of women’s and girls’ rights, especially in Afghanistan, and seeing no action .

The Taliban have imposed severe restrictions on girls and women to conform to their austere vision of Islam since they returned to power in August last year, effectively shutting them out of public life.

Hardline Islamists have closed secondary schools for girls in most provinces and barred women from many government jobs.

They also ordered women to cover themselves fully in public, ideally with an overall burqa.

“The women of Afghanistan are now left at the mercy of a group that is inherently anti-women and does not recognize women as human beings,” said Razia Sayad, an Afghan lawyer and former commissioner at the Afghan Commission. independent of human rights. .

“Astounding Regression”

“Women of this country, we don’t exist… We are erased,” Saraj told the council during a debate that focused specifically on the rights of women and girls in Afghanistan.

She called on the UN’s top human rights body to take all possible steps to improve the situation.

“I beg of you all: please, if this council has anything to do, do it!” she said, adding that “otherwise please don’t talk about it. Because talking has been…cheap” when it comes to Afghanistan.

“You have to do something.”

She and others have suggested the council could set up an independent expert panel to monitor all abuses, with the aim of holding perpetrators to account.

“God only knows what kind of atrocities go unreported,” she warned.

Richard Bennett, the special rapporteur on the situation of rights in Afghanistan, also stressed the urgent need to strengthen accountability, suggesting that the situation could be characterized as “gender apartheid”.

Earlier on Monday, Bennett presented his first report on the general rights situation, warning the council that “Afghans are trapped in a human rights crisis that the world seems powerless to address.”

In addition to the “staggering regression” in the rights of women and girls, he listed a host of other violations, including the persecution of the Hazara and other Shia minorities.

Afghanistan’s Hazara Shiites have been persecuted for decades, with the Taliban accused of abuses against the group when they first ruled from 1996 to 2001 and resumed after coming to power last year.

Bennet said Hazara and other groups have been “arbitrarily arrested, tortured, summarily executed, displaced from traditional lands, subjected to discriminatory taxes and otherwise marginalized”.

They are also the frequent target of attacks, notably from the Taliban’s enemy, the Islamic State-Khorasan group, which considers them heretics.

“These attacks appear to be systematic in nature and reflect elements of organizational policy,” Bennett told the council, warning that the attacks bear “the hallmarks of international crimes and must be thoroughly investigated.”

International crimes cover the most serious crimes of concern to the global community: war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide.

The United Nations mission in Afghanistan has accused Taliban authorities of intimidating and harassing its female personnel, including arresting three women for questioning on Monday.

READ | India concerned about discriminatory and inferior status given to women in Afghanistan

— ENDS —

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Charles and Camilla will tour the UK and receive condolences from home countries https://list-nation.com/charles-and-camilla-will-tour-the-uk-and-receive-condolences-from-home-countries/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 22:54:54 +0000 https://list-nation.com/charles-and-camilla-will-tour-the-uk-and-receive-condolences-from-home-countries/ King Charles III and his Queen consort will hear condolences from the four home countries when the new monarch visits the UK ahead of the Queen’s state funeral. Charles will travel to Edinburgh, Belfast and Wales in the coming days with Camilla and the Prime Minister, to hear politicians’ condolences and respond to their words […]]]>

King Charles III and his Queen consort will hear condolences from the four home countries when the new monarch visits the UK ahead of the Queen’s state funeral.

Charles will travel to Edinburgh, Belfast and Wales in the coming days with Camilla and the Prime Minister, to hear politicians’ condolences and respond to their words of sympathy.

On Sunday, after meeting Baroness Scotland, Secretary General of the Commonwealth, at Buckingham Palace, Charles will welcome high commissioners and their wives from the countries where he is head of state in the Bow Room of the royal residence.

The King will begin his visit to lawmakers at Westminster Hall in London on Monday, where both Houses of Parliament will express their condolences to the new monarch and his wife – and the King will give his response.

Charles will tour the four nations with Camilla (Victoria Jones/PA)

(PA wire)

Later today, Charles and Camilla will fly to Edinburgh where the King will inspect the guard of honor at the Palace of Holyroodhouse, before attending the key ceremony in the forecourt.

During the day, the King will join his other siblings – the Duke of York, the Earl of Wessex, the Princess Royal and her husband Vice Admiral Sir Tim Laurence – walking behind the Queen’s coffin as he is moved from the Palace of Holyroodhouse to St Giles’ Cathedral where she will rest for 24 hours so the public can pay their respects.

Camilla and other family members will travel by car and all members of the Royal Family will attend a service of thanksgiving for the Queen’s life.

At the palace, the King will hold audiences with Prime Minister Nicola Sturgeon, followed by an audience with Alison Johnstone, Speaker of the Scottish Parliament.

Words of sympathy will be expressed by the Scottish Parliament when Charles and Camilla are present to receive a motion of condolence, to which the King will respond.

That evening, the monarch will hold a vigil at the queen’s coffin with other members of the royal family.

Belfast is next with the royal couple flying to Ulster on Tuesday to visit Hillsborough Castle, where they will view an exhibition about the late Queen’s long association with Northern Ireland.

The King will then meet Northern Ireland Secretary Chris Heaton-Harris and party leaders and receive a message of condolence led by the Speaker of the Northern Ireland Assembly, again making his response.

After a short reception in Hillsborough, the King and Queen Consort will travel to St Anne’s Cathedral for a service of prayer and reflection and prior to the event Charles will meet leaders of all of Northern Ireland’s major religions, and later the royal couple will return to London.

In tribute to his late mother, the King will lead Wednesday’s procession behind the gun carriage carrying her coffin to Westminster Hall, where the lying in state will begin ahead of her state funeral on September 19.

The planned trip to Wales is scheduled for Friday, details will be released at a later date.

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What will be the future of the Commonwealth of Nations after the death of Queen Elizabeth? https://list-nation.com/what-will-be-the-future-of-the-commonwealth-of-nations-after-the-death-of-queen-elizabeth/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 01:09:33 +0000 https://list-nation.com/what-will-be-the-future-of-the-commonwealth-of-nations-after-the-death-of-queen-elizabeth/ One of the questions that arose after the confirmation of the death of Queen Isabella IIA powerful organization of the former British colonies, the Commonwealth of Nations is concerned about the future. This group of nations and regions share the principles of democracy, defend human rights and champion the fight for the environment. There are […]]]>

One of the questions that arose after the confirmation of the death of Queen Isabella IIA powerful organization of the former British colonies, the Commonwealth of Nations is concerned about the future.

This group of nations and regions share the principles of democracy, defend human rights and champion the fight for the environment.

There are 54 flags that are part of the Commonwealth, an organization created in 1931 and led and championed by Queen Elizabeth II.

She was the political figure of 54 independent and semi-independent countries, which represent about a third of the world’s population, or about 2,500 million people.

The emperor was a symbol of unity, a historical link with other nations.

in life, Queen Elizabeth II has always advocated the unity and relevance of this group, However, there were those who deemed it unnecessary and, as in the case of Barbados, the republic could be converted. According to the information that has emerged, Australia can follow these steps.

In a conversation with Noticias RCN, Valentina Mena, historian at the University of Javeriana, explained that “relations with these countries are mainly due to the fact that they were either a colony or very close to a colony, as in the case of Canada, one of which was a British colony.

Read also: Who is the new King Carlos III of the United Kingdom?

What will happen to the Commonwealth after the death of Queen Elizabeth?

In some of these countries, Queen Elizabeth was the head of state. “Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Jamaica, are countries that retain the figure of the British monarch as head of state, but in countries where it does not exist, where the figure of a queen or a king as head of state is still not accepted, there is a private government, that is, if it is a presidential system, there will be a president” , said Professor Oscar Palma of the Universidad del Rosario.

After the Queen’s death, many wonder what the future of this Commonwealth of Nations will be and whether it can be dissolved, but for Professor Palma, “it is difficult to foresee this possibility, given that the Commonwealth of Nations Nations has already been There is a tradition of years, several decades.They are established institutions where the queen and the emperor are the only heads.The monarchy having very precise rules of succession, the new king takes the head of the organization”.

For his part, the historian indicated that from now on Carlos Tercero “must unite all these nations, he must preserve them and not neglect them”.

It should be noted that in the future it may happen that some nations abandon the figure of the emperor as head of state.

see everythingn: Coins, national anthem and other changes in the UK due to the death of Queen Elizabeth II

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A long way to go for First Nations people with disabilities – the Royal Commission wants to hear from you https://list-nation.com/a-long-way-to-go-for-first-nations-people-with-disabilities-the-royal-commission-wants-to-hear-from-you/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 01:14:40 +0000 https://list-nation.com/a-long-way-to-go-for-first-nations-people-with-disabilities-the-royal-commission-wants-to-hear-from-you/ A recent Disability Royal Commission public hearing, held in Alice Springs, heard from 28 witnesses about the experiences of First Nations people in remote and very remote communities with the National Disability Insurance Scheme. Witnesses spoke of the inability to find disability support services that allow them to stay in the country, the difficulty of […]]]>

A recent Disability Royal Commission public hearing, held in Alice Springs, heard from 28 witnesses about the experiences of First Nations people in remote and very remote communities with the National Disability Insurance Scheme.

Witnesses spoke of the inability to find disability support services that allow them to stay in the country, the difficulty of engaging with an NDIS bureaucracy that often struggles to understand the community and culture, and intergenerational trauma that often occurs when First Nations people engage with government institutions.

This is not the first hearing focused on First Nations – two other hearings have focused on child welfare systems.

All three hearings focused on the first-hand experiences of First Nations people with disabilities.

The Royal Commission alternated between interviews with people with disabilities (as well as families and supporters) and interviewing witnesses representing the NDIA or state and territory departments responsible for child protection systems.

We also heard from representatives of First Nations community-controlled organizations and academic experts.

To learn more about these hearings, with links to Royal Commission transcripts and videos, visit our website.

People with disabilities and our organisations, including People with Disability Australia (PWDA) and First Peoples Disability Network (FPDN), fought long and hard for a Royal Commission on Disability.

We fought for a chance to be heard and to shed light on systems that have failed to uphold our right to live free from violence, abuse, neglect and neglect. exploitation.

Now we have one, and we’re working just as hard to make sure it really makes a difference.

One of the most important elements is to ensure that everyone’s voices are heard, especially people from First Nations and other marginalized communities who face double discrimination and are disadvantaged as people with disabilities.

At PWDA, we run a free, independent and confidential advocacy service.

Our lawyers can help you prepare and submit a story to the Disability Royal Commission, including putting you in touch with legal advice and counseling if you need it, and supporting you with other disability issues (such as NDIS or Centrelink).

You can also talk to an Indigenous Advocate from the NDPF or find a local advocacy service near you.

Upcoming Royal Commission on Disability public hearings will uncover the experiences of people with disabilities in police custody, guardianship or administrative order, and with public harassment.

But your story can be about any type of violence, abuse, neglect or exploitation, in any part of your life.

At school, at work, at home, in the shops or at the doctor’s.

You can talk to a lawyer for advice and help determining what, if anything, you want to share, and how to make sure anything you don’t want to share publicly stays private.

And you can tell your story any way you want.

You can write it down, tell the Royal Commission over the phone, or send a video or audio recording.

People even sent in artwork and poetry.

You have until the end of the year to submit something, but you don’t have to tell your story all at once.

You can send as many submissions as you want, for example, if you have something to say on different topics or find additional details to add.

These stories will help the Royal Commission understand what is wrong with people with disabilities in Australia – and if you give your permission, parts of your story could be included in the final report as examples.

Public hearing witness Topsy Jackamarra said: ‘We all have our own stories. We must unite to be strong, to make things change. Because it doesn’t work for our mafia.

What is your disability story?

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Putin’s war an ‘aggression against peaceful nations’ https://list-nation.com/putins-war-an-aggression-against-peaceful-nations/ Sun, 04 Sep 2022 05:56:56 +0000 https://list-nation.com/putins-war-an-aggression-against-peaceful-nations/

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Sergiy Kyslytsya, Permanent Representative of Ukraine to the UN and Ambassador of Ukraine to TT (non-resident) in an interview at the European Union Delegation to TT, Queen's Park East, Port of Spain .  - SUREASH CHOLAI
Sergiy Kyslytsya, Permanent Representative of Ukraine to the UN and Ambassador of Ukraine to TT (non-resident) in an interview at the European Union Delegation to TT, Queen’s Park East, Port of Spain . – SUREASH CHOLAI

As Trinidad and Tobago celebrated the 60th anniversary of its independence, the Ukrainian people were going through the sixth month of their independence and were under attack. Russia invaded Ukraine on February 24.

Sergiy Kyslytsya, Permanent Representative of Ukraine to the UN and Ambassador of Ukraine to TT (non-resident), said that the scale of destruction in Ukraine during this war exceeded the level of World War II . Then 20,000 citizens of Mariupol, Ukraine were killed, but by the end of spring 2022, more than 30,000 had been killed there. In addition, other cities have been or are being destroyed.

In an interview with Sunday Newsday at the European Union Delegation to TT, Queen’s Park East, Port of Spain, Kyslytsya congratulated TT on the 60th anniversary of its independence.

“Independence means a lot to your country as much as it does to my country. Ukraine has been struggling for independence for centuries. We were incorporated into the Russian Empire in the 17th century, and until this century the nation Ukrainian society constantly aspired to become independent.

“The tragic irony is that this year, on Independence Day, August 24, we also marked exactly six months of large-scale aggression and invasion of Ukraine.”

Ukraine became independent from the Soviet Union in 1991.

He said Russia’s war on Ukraine actually started in February 2017, when Russia moved into Crimea, which was internationally recognized as part of Ukraine, tried to illegally annex it. and sparked war in eastern Ukraine.

He said the international reaction to the war in 2022 was very different from the reaction in 2014.

In 2014, 100 nations supported the United Nations General Assembly resolution on the territorial integrity of Ukraine. On March 2, 2022, 148 countries voted in favor of the resolution condemning Russian aggression, while Syria, Belarus, North Korea and Eritrea supported Russia.

Children play jumping over destroyed Russian military vehicles on display in central Kyiv, Ukraine on Saturday. -AP Photo

“This aggression is seen as an aggression against the entire peaceful, democratic and law-abiding community. Because it is the most flagrant violation of the United Nations Charter since the end of World War II and, in fact, since the creation of the UN.

Kyslytsya expressed gratitude that the TT leadership chose to uphold the UN Charter and support Ukraine, saying it should be proud to be a member of the international community. He said TT should not underestimate the importance of his vote because, even though it was a small nation, size did not matter in the United Nations General Assembly . Each country had a vote that counted.

“When you vote for the defense of the Charter of the United Nations and the principles and purposes, you are voting for the environment, on a global scale, which will enable you and all other countries to face up to other challenges. Because it is a fact that the current war diverts so much effort and resources – financial and human – from solving other outstanding problems on a global scale.

He used climate change, the energy crisis and food shortages as examples. He pointed out that small countries, especially island nations, contribute minimally to climate change, but are among the most affected.

He said development depends on the collective action of those who contribute the most to climate change. But instead of focusing on plans to combat it, some countries were facing food shortages or trying to maintain energy supplies, putting climate change on the back burner.

Some countries have gone back to coal mining and using coal for energy, when coal emits the most carbon dioxide per unit of energy and is the main source of global temperature rise contributing to climate change.

Energy shortages have also increased the cost of production and therefore import costs.

Global energy problems were exacerbated when gas exports from Russia – the largest exporter of oil and natural gas – were cut in a bid to limit its ability to finance the war in Ukraine.

In addition, the two countries exported about 24% of the world’s wheat, so between the war in Ukraine and the sanctions against Russia, the supply decreased, which led to an increase in food prices in the world. world.

All of this has affected every citizen of TT, from business to groceries.

EU and NATO membership

Kyslytsya said more than 160 countries, including Ukraine, cannot defend themselves.

He said that the global solution, the UN, did not prevent the war because the Russian Federation, along with China, France, the United Kingdom and the United States, is a permanent member of the Council of UN security, composed of 15 members. And the permanent members could veto, which Russia did with respect to Ukraine.

A priest blesses coffins with unidentified civilians who died in the territory of the Bucha community during the Russian occupation period in February-March 2022, during a funeral in Bucha, near Kyiv, Ukraine, on Friday . -AP Photo

Ukraine therefore had to turn to a regional solution, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). It also applied for European Union (EU) membership shortly after being invaded by Russia, and the European Council granted it candidate status in June.

Kyslytsya dismissed Russian President Vladimir Putin’s motives for invading his country.

He said that before the war, Putin wanted to prevent the expansion of NATO. But its invasion led Finland and Sweden, known over the years for their neutrality in international armed conflicts, to formally apply for NATO membership.

Also, Putin said he didn’t want to have “more NATO” on Russia’s borders, but Ukraine’s borders were shared by other NATO countries. If Russia took control of the country, it would be the exact opposite.

“No matter the grievances, launching a full-scale war is not the answer. Ukraine should therefore not be blamed for a war solution. It was Russia who launched this unjustified and unprovoked war.

He added that Russia could offer nothing to Ukraine because it had “no rule of law”, no new technologies and was “economically backward”.

As an example, he said that Russia’s contribution to the regular UN budget was less than 2% compared to that of the United States, which was capped at 22%. Among other things, budget contributions were based on each country’s gross national income, indicating that Russia was not as financially well off as it claims.

“The Russian Federation, which owns this incredibly large territory, was telling all of us, ‘You should be afraid of us because we have the second most powerful army’, which turned out to be a lie. They contribute to the budget of the whole organization at less than two percent and they always try to dictate to all of us how we should live.

Kyslytsya said credible evidence of Putin’s war crimes and crimes against humanity was being collected by countries and organizations, including the International Criminal Court (ICC). He said the ICC had a team to collect the data and preserve evidence of the war, and that satellite imagery meant Putin could not hide his actions.

“What is happening today is the result of three decades of complacency and turning a blind eye to what Russia was doing. Because every time Russia did something, we, including Ukraine, expressed our concern. and then go back to business as usual, so we got Putin to the point where he confidently believed that whatever he did, we would be unhappy first, and then we would continue to operate as usual.

“That’s why one of the most important things is the issue of accountability and the fight against impunity.”

He noted that the Accountability Group of Friends (GoF), consisting of around 50 countries, was formed to ensure accountability for international crimes committed by Russia in Ukraine. And fighting impunity was important for everyone. because there were many conflicts in the world in which thousands of people were killed.

Once the war is over, Kyslytsya hopes to continue discussions with TT on “mutually complementary” topics.

He said he first met Foreign and Caricom Minister Dr Amery Browne in October 2021 and was impressed with his “clarity of thought” and common sense approach.

“Then we had a whole list of things that, despite our geographical distance from each other, we could have developed.”

This included the agricultural sector, IT and digitization. Unfortunately, due to the invasion, these questions were suspended until the end of the war. Then, he said, the needs and interests of the Ukrainian people could be identified and the two countries could see what TT could bring.

He added that he regretted that Ukraine could not afford a permanent presence in TT and hoped that TT could be elected to the United Nations General Assembly in the future.


]]> Westminster deals ‘demoralizing’, say former ministers of devolved nations | UK News https://list-nation.com/westminster-deals-demoralizing-say-former-ministers-of-devolved-nations-uk-news/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 05:36:00 +0000 https://list-nation.com/westminster-deals-demoralizing-say-former-ministers-of-devolved-nations-uk-news/ The UK government’s dealings with devolved nations have been described by former ministers as ‘demoralizing’, ‘depressing’ and lacking in understanding of the issues in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. As former Brexit minister David Frost is tipped to take charge of union issues in a potential Liz Truss government, nine former ministers from the Edinburgh, […]]]>

The UK government’s dealings with devolved nations have been described by former ministers as ‘demoralizing’, ‘depressing’ and lacking in understanding of the issues in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

As former Brexit minister David Frost is tipped to take charge of union issues in a potential Liz Truss government, nine former ministers from the Edinburgh, Cardiff and Belfast governments have spoken out about their quarrels and frustrations with Westminster during interviews with the Institute for Government.

Michael Russell, Scotland’s former cabinet secretary for the constitution, Europe and external affairs, described how ministers in Wales and Northern Ireland used to complain about interference from a senior Tory minister who would be “lovely to you” but then “would come out and short wildly” against them.

Jeane Freeman, Scotland’s former cabinet secretary for health, complained that the UK government ‘just doesn’t understand [devolution] and they paid no attention to it”.

Some powers, including economic, health and justice matters, have been devolved to the three nations since 1998, but the Scottish National Party’s desire to hold another independence referendum in Scotland and the he impact of Brexit on Northern Ireland remain major fault lines in the union.

The potential appointment of Lord Frost, known for his pugnacious approach, as head of the Cabinet Office raises the prospect of deadlier battles to come.

Michael Russell, Scotland’s former cabinet secretary for the constitution, Europe and external affairs, said tensions between London and the devolved nations had grown under Boris Johnson’s rule.

“I think the difference between the May and Johnson administrations is that there was recognition under [Theresa] May, however limited and reluctant, the legitimate interests of devolved governments and their rights were, when there was nothing but contempt for devolution from the Johnson government, expressed at all levels, even by territorial state secretaries,” he said.

Freeman, a two-time minister at Holyrood, said the lack of interest in devolved government was not limited to the Conservative Party.

“That was also my experience with the Labor Party – [the UK government] don’t understand devolution…and they didn’t pay any attention to it.

Máirtín Ó Muilleoir of Sinn Féin said working with the UK government was ‘demoralizing, depressing’ and ‘a waste of my time’, while Stephen Farry, Alliance MP for North Down and former employment minister for Stormont, complained that the Devolved government in Belfast was like a “clearing house” with Sinn Féin and the Democratic Unionist party sharing the agenda.

“There wasn’t really a sense of ‘here’s a vision of where we want to take Northern Ireland,'” he told the IfG.

The DUP is boycotting Stormont over Brexit, but Farry says when he was in devolved government 10 years ago there was “almost collegiality” between the party and arch-rival Sinn Féin.

Alun Davies, the former agriculture minister and Welsh Labor member of the Senedd in Wales, complained that the recently deceased Secretary of State for Wales, Simon Hart, had turned into a ” monster” attacking not only the decisions of the decentralized government, but the “fact that we exist” with “ridiculous” comments.

“I fundamentally disagree with what the UK government says and does… but I am not attacking their right to exist,” he said.

Claire Sugden, independent trade unionist and former Justice Minister of Northern Ireland, spoke about the importance of showing respect to political opponents.

“It’s not this person I work with, it’s the office they’ve been assigned to, and in most cases it’s thousands of people. So when I disrespect that individual, I disrespect the people he represents,” she said.

A government spokesperson said: “We have seen positive cooperation with decentralized governments on key issues, including the conduct of the international response against Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and on COVID-19.

“Earlier this year we published a landmark agreement outlining how we are strengthening relationships for the benefit of people across the UK and so far there have been over 160 meetings with the UK government and deputy ministers .”

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